Asda’s Blueberries go green– Supermarket retailer launches first fully recyclable blueberry punnet and announces trial across several other lines

· Asda launches first 100% recyclable blueberry punnet, including the film lid
· The move will mean 5.5 million film lids will now be recycled with the tray each year
· The retailer announces a trial on several other fresh punnets including grapes and tomatoes
· In July, 94% of Customers say they feel personally responsible for recycling

Asda has launched the first 100% recyclable blueberry punnet, which thanks to new packaging innovation, means customers can now recycle the punnets and film as a whole, without removing the lid.

The new and sustainable punnets have been designed so customers can’t remove the film lid, which means the whole tray can be recycled together, a move will now mean 5.5 million lids per year will be recycled along with the tray.

The supermarket retailer has also announced that this new design will be trialled across several other fresh produce lines, including grapes and tomatoes, to help make recycling easier for customers and save around 110 million lids per year.

In July, the Asda 1000 survey* found that 94% of customers said that they felt personally responsible for recycling, indicating that sustainability is still top of customers minds.

Fiona Dobson, Asda’s Own-Brand Packaging Development Manager said:

“We are continuing to work hard to look at innovative solutions to help our customers on the journey to use less and recycle more, we know it’s something they and our colleagues are really passionate about.

This latest move to help make recycling easier for our customers is another important step on our journey as a retailer to make all our own brand packaging, whatever material, 100% recyclable by 2025”.

Customers can now purchase the 100% recyclable blueberry punnets in store and online and the trial on the other fresh produce lines will begin later in the year.

*The Asda 1000 is a monthly survey of at least 1000 Asda customers to test how government policy affects shopping preferences, motivations, attitudes and behaviours.